Paul Higgins

Paul Higgins

Paul Higgins is the Director of the American Meteorological Society’s Policy Program. He works to increase the societal benefits from information and services relating to weather, water, and climate. 

Paul's research examines climate change and its causes, consequences, and potential solutions. He examines the two-way interaction between the atmosphere and the land-surface to help quantify responses and feedbacks to climate change. His policy analysis helps characterize climate risks and identify potential risk management strategies. He works with decision-makers to develop new policy options that can overcome contentious political obstacles. Paul also works to inform policy makers, members of the media, and the general public about climate science and climate policy.

In 2011, he was named a Google Science Communication Fellow. From 2005-2006 he was a Congressional Science Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). During his fellowship year, Paul worked on climate policy in the United States Senate. From 2003-2005 he was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the University of California. He received Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University and a B.S. from The University of Michigan. He is a former fellow of the Department of Energy’s Global Change Education Program.

 
 
Recent publications: 
Higgins, P.A.T., and Steinbuck, J.V. A practical tool for the assessment of climate change risk and risk management. Submitted. 
 
Higgins, P.A.T., and Steinbuck, J.V. A minimal model for climate change risk assessment. Submitted.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. Frameworks for pricing greenhouse gas emissions and the policy objectives they promote.Energy Policy. In Press.
 
Steinbuck, J.V., and Higgins, P.A.T. 2013. Climate Change in the FY2014 Budget. In: AAAS Report XXXVIII, Research and Development FY 2014. The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Washington, DC. (pp 195-201).
 
Higgins, P.A.T., and Harte, J. 2012. Carbon cycle uncertainty increases climate change risks and mitigation challenges. Journal of Climate. 25: 7660-7668.
 
Steinbuck, J.V., and Higgins, P.A.T. Climate Change in the FY2012 Budget. In: AAAS Report XXXVI, Research and Development FY 2012. The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Washington, DC. (pp 179-185).
                                                                                                                                  
Higgins, P.A.T. 2011. United States Federal Policy: Climate Policy. In: Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather, 2nd edition. Stephen H. Schneider, Terry L. Root, and Michael D. Mastrandrea (eds.). Oxford University Press.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2011. Disturbance. In: Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather, 2nd edition. Stephen H. Schneider, Terry L. Root, and Michael D. Mastrandrea (eds.) Oxford University Press.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2010. Design principles and remaining needs for U.S. federal climate policy: emission fees.Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 91(5)601-609. 
  
Higgins, P.A.T. 2010. Climate Change in the FY2011 Budget. In: AAAS Report XXXV, Research and Development FY 2011. The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Washington, DC. (pp 171-178).
                                                                                                                                  
Higgins, P.A.T. 2009. Carbon cycle amplification: how optimistic assumptions cause persistent underestimates of potential climate damages and mitigation needs. Climatic Change. 95:363-368.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2009. Climate Change Research and Development in the FY2010 Budget. In: AAAS Report XXXIV, Research and Development FY 2010. The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Washington, DC.            
                                                                                                                                   
Higgins, P.A.T. 2008. Science in the policy process: rational decision-making or Faustian bargain? Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 89(5):688-690.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2008. Federal climate policy: design principles and remaining needs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 89(1):102-103.
 
Srinivasan, U.T., Carey, S.P., Hallstein, E., Higgins, P.A.T., Kerr, A.C., Koteen, L.E., Smith, A.B., Watson, R., Harte, J., Norgaard, R.B. 2008. The debt of nations and the distribution of ecological impacts from human activities. PNAS. 105:1768-1773.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2007. A year to solve the climate problem. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 88(8)1181-1185.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2007. Biodiversity loss under existing land use and climate change: an illustration using northern South America. Global Ecology and Biogeography. 16:197-204.
 
Higgins, P.A.T. 2006. Toward an optimal approach for health and transportation. Environmental Conservation. 33(3):184.
 
Higgins, P.A.T., and Harte, J. 2006. Biophysical and biogeochemical responses to climate change depend on dispersal and migration. BioScience. 56(5):407-417.
 
Higgins, P.A.T., Chan, K.M.A., and Porder, S.  2006.  Bridge over a philosophical divide.  Evidence & Policy.  2(2):251-257.
 
Higgins, P.A.T.  2005. Exercise based transportation reduces obesity, oil dependence, and carbon emissions. Environmental Conservation.  32(3):197-202.
 
Higgins, P.A.T., and Schneider, S.H.  2005.  Long-term potential ecosystem responses to greenhouse gas induced thermohaline circulation collapse.  Global Change Biology.  11(5):699-709.
                                                                                                                    
Higgins, P.A.T., and Higgins, M.  2005.  A healthy reduction in oil consumption and carbon emissions.